Love, Election, and Chocolate gets anime adaptation

Koi to senkyo to chocolate, an eroge from sprite just announced to get anime adaptation.

From ANN:

The January issue of ASCII Media Works’ Dengeki G’s Magazine is announcing a 2012 television anime adaptation of sprite/fairys’ Love, Election, & Chocolate (Koi to Senkyo to Chocolate) adult game on Wednesday. The 2010 Windows game follows the protagonist at a “mega academy” with over 6,000 students. To save his cooking club from being abolished, the protagonist agrees to run for student body president.

The art was good and as usual I have no idea what the story is about 😀

And again, as usual, I need to prepare for art quality degradation compared to original art. At least I’m not a big fan of Akinashi Yuu (and Koichoco being the only eroge art he/she ever done) though it’ll still be sad seeing it degrades.

No information on animation studio or pretty much everything else.

Hitsugi no Chaika chapter 1

Here be fileserve link to Hitsugi no Chaika chapter 1 which seems to be recommended by Kurogane.

Here’s the bash command I used to leech from this batoto.com thingy. Originally one-liner but reformatted for readability:

for i in {1..66}; do
  curl -O "$(curl http://www.batoto.net/read/_/52737/hitsugime-no-chaika_ch1_by_village-idiot/$i 
    | grep 'img src="http://img.batoto.com/comics/' 
    | sed -E 's/.*src="([^"]+)".*/1/')"
done

Yes, I parsed html using sed/regex 😀

Flame away.

PS: Apparently I fail at leeching shit. Should’ve checked file formats before deciding it’s jpg. Just extract the files and rename the files with correct extension if you’re feeling dilligent (or getting broken image with MMCE). Only page 1-4 are jpg.

PS: whatever. Fixed everything. Added ddl from my own site since I want to waste some bandwidth.

[ Fileserve | myconan.net ]

WordPress Multisite with nginx (subdomain/wildcard domain ver.)

WordPress Multisite, previously known as WordPress MU (Multi User), is an application which allows hosting multiple WordPress blogs with just one installation. Instead of creating copies of WordPress for each users’ blogs, one can use one installation of Multisite to be used by multiple users, each with their own blogs. Personal/custom domain is also possible as used for this blog (this blog’s master site is genshiken-itb.org). Too bad, the official documentation only provided guide for installing on Apache. If you haven’t known, I usually avoid Apache – I simply more proficient with nginx. Of course, this blog is also running on nginx therefore it’s perfectly possible to run WordPress Multisite on nginx.

At any rate, reading the official documentation is still a must and this post will only cover the nginx version of Apache-specific parts (namely Apache Virtual Hosts and Mod Rewrite and .htaccess and Mod Rewrite) and only for subdomain install. Subdirectory one will or will not follow some time later.

Assuming you have working nginx and php-cgi (with process manager like php-fpm or supervisord), for starter you’ll want to create a specific file for this WP install. Let’s say this file named app-wordpress.conf. Obviously you have put WordPress installation somewhere in your server. In this example I put the files in /srv/http/genshiken-itb.org/.php/wordpress. Its content:

client_max_body_size 100m;
root /srv/http/genshiken-itb.org;
location /. { return 404; }
location / {
  root /srv/http/genshiken-itb.org/.php/wordpress;
  index index.php;
  try_files $uri $uri/ /index.php?$args;
  rewrite ^/files/(.*) /wp-includes/ms-files.php?file=$1;
  location ~ .php$ {
    try_files $uri =404;
    fastcgi_pass unix:/tmp/php-genshiken.sock;
    fastcgi_read_timeout 600;
    fastcgi_send_timeout 600;
    fastcgi_index index.php;
    fastcgi_param SCRIPT_FILENAME $request_filename;
    include fastcgi_params;
  }
}

Simple enough. Actually, it’s exact same with normal WordPress install except one extra line:

rewrite ^/files/(.*) /wp-includes/ms-files.php?file=$1;

And you’re set. Note that I set fastcgi timeouts higher than default to work around the slow performance of Amazon EC2 Micro Instance. Should only needed on network upgrade and massive blog import.

Anyway, in your main nginx.conf file, put:

server {
  listen 80;
  server_name *.genshiken-itb.org;
  include app-wordpress.conf;
 }

In proper place. The usefulness of separate file for WordPress configuration will become apparent once you want to tweak performance for some blogs. I’ll explain that later if I feel like to.

Solaris 10 Patch Where?

If you haven’t noticed, Solaris 10 is not available for free anymore. At least the patches. It’s Oracle after all.

Security patches were originally available for free when Sun stil exists but not anymore now. From PCA site:

Unlike before, even security patches are not available for free anymore.

So you’re screwed if you don’t have one. You’re better off installing OpenIndiana instead.

In case you’re one of the lucky folks (like me /hahahaha) having office Oracle account with Solaris support contract, I suggest checking out PCA to ease up installing patches. Also make sure to install it through OpenCSW for easiest update method.

User Management in Solaris 10

We’re back with Solaris 10 administration series. This time, it’s the user management part.

Securing the Password

For God knows why reason (probably legacy), the default password hashing algorithm in Solaris 10 is the classic UNIX DES hashing. To change it, edit /etc/security/policy.conf and find line starting with CRYPT_DEFAULT and change it to this:

CRYPT_DEFAULT=2a

(you can also set to other value but 2a should be good enough)

And to change the root password, first edit /etc/shadow and append $2a$ to the 2nd (password) field like this:

root:$2a$afgfdg....:...

or else chaning the root password using passwd won’t be set using the newly configured algorithm.

Creating User

First of all remember that there’s character limit of 8 for username in Solaris. Linux doesn’t have this but it’ll break ps (displaying UID instead of username). Also creating directory in /home is not possible because of several reasons. The proper way is to create home directory somewhere and create relevant entry in /etc/auto_home.

useradd -s /bin/bash newuser
mkdir -p /export/home/newuser
chown newuser:staff /export/home/newuser
printf "%st%sn" "newuser" "localhost:/export/home/newuser" >> /etc/auto_home
passwd newuser

This will let Solaris to automount (loopback filesystem/lofs) the actual directory (in this case /export/home/newuser) to /home.

Of course you can set the directory somewhere else, though having home not in /home feels weird.

Networking in Solaris 10

Since *BSD is getting boring, I decided to try an old but largely used enterprise OS: Solaris 10. I’m trying the latest update so it’s got ZFS and all the bling.

Anyway, I’m posting this so I can find this again whenever I need to.

Hostname/DNS

Here be hostname: /etc/nodename. Don’t forget to add relevant entries to /etc/hosts. And while at it, don’t forget to add loghost to 127.0.0.1 on hosts entry. Don’t forget to set /etc/nsswitch.conf with content of /etc/nsswitch.dns since unless you know what you’re doing, that’s what you want.

Static IPv4

/etc/hostname.if. Fill in with relevant IP address.

Static IPv4 Default Route

/etc/defaultrouter. Fill in with relevant default gateway’s IP address

Static IPv6

/etc/hostname6.if. Fill in with IPv6 address in following format:

addif some:ipv6:add::ress/prefixlen up

Also disable service for network discovery protocol (IPv6 routing etc autoconfiguration) by issuing

/usr/sbin/svcadm disable routing/ndp

Or not. It’s an undead zombie. Just add that line to /etc/rc3.d/S99rclocal (or create the file and make it executable if it isn’t there yet) to really kill the service upon boot.

Static IPv6 Default Route

It’s buried in /etc/inet/static_routes. Modified using route -p. Execute this for setting default IPv6 route:

route -p add -inet6 default de:fa:ult::gw

And that’s about it. It’s more or less same in Solaris 11 but you need to disable physical:nwam service in there. Also there’s ipadm but I think it’s still pretty much a black magic.

DHCP

For DHCP/dynamic, it is much easier:

touch /etc/hostname.if
touch /etc/hostname6.if
touch /etc/dhcp.if

no-www for nginx

If you happen to be in no-www camp and want to redirect people accessing www.whateverdomain.com to the no-www version but have lots of domain, instead of writing one by one and you’re not keen in using config generator (I’m not), you can use this:

server {
  listen 80;
  listen [::]:80 ipv6only=on;
  server_name ~^www.(?<domain>.+)$;
  rewrite ^ $scheme://$domain$request_uri? permanent;
  access_log /var/log/nginx/access-no_www.log;
}

Remove listen [::]:80 ipv6only=on; if you’re not using IPv6 and adjust the log file path to wherever you want (or just turn off or remove it altogether).

Note that this trick doesn’t work well with HTTPS/SSL domains since you’ll get big fat warning about incorrect domain name in certificate or about self-signed certificate if you’re using wildcard one.